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Old 10/06/2010, 12:56 AM   #1
potpushr
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How hard can it be to keep GONIOPORA?

I really been wanting to get a red goniopora with yellow centers but have been hesitant due to hearing they like pristine water and are finicky.. I have been keeping a lot of sps successfully and was wondering if it was going to be harder to keep goniopora healthy than sps. ALL insight encouraged.


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Old 10/06/2010, 09:56 AM   #2
potpushr
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Over 20 views and no input? Im sure people out there raise goniopora..


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Old 10/06/2010, 11:27 AM   #3
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No personal experience but I keep seeing captive grown frags at swaps, I'd have to assume if you started with a piece like that it wouldnt be too difficult.


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Old 10/06/2010, 11:32 AM   #4
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Some info here for you:
http://www.**************/cotm/may07/index.htm


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Old 10/06/2010, 11:34 AM   #5
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sorry web site name is blocked


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Old 10/06/2010, 11:43 AM   #6
JARJOZ
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Goniopora: Daisy or Flowerpot Coral
Family: Poritidae Genus: Goniopora
by Sara Bertolino

Coral Overview
Goniopora spp. "daisy" or "flowerpot" corals have been common imports from Indonesia and other coral-collecting regions since the early years of the reef-keeping hobby. Alveopora spp. are less-frequently harvested relatives of Goniopora spp. These distinct genera are often grouped together by aquarists because they have similarly elongate polyps with daisy-like heads. The difference is that the petal-like tentacles in Goniopora number 24 and in Alveopora there are just 12. (Julian Sprung)

In reviewing numerous articles on this coral, it is most likely wrong to generalize that all Goniopora are difficult to keep. Please do note that this is not a beginner's coral and is better left at the LFS than in your tank if you have not done your homework on its requirements. As Fin and Feather states in the Advanced Aquarist Online Magazine, "dozens of people around the country and the world have been successful with these corals for many years, some as long as nine years and longer. The ability to share with fellow aquarists frags from these long-term colonies will help ensure the establishment of captive strains of Goniopora . Many people have also successfully grown daughter colonies dropped by the parent colony." With that being said, I believe the future of keeping Gonioporas in our reef aquariums will become a reality for the many that admire this coral.
The range of desired flow, food, and light needs differs among the many species of Goniopora . Some grow quite large and a mature colony may look like a colony of Porites from a distance. Others have short polyps and are encrusting. Still others are free living on soft substrates.
The different species have polyps of different shapes and colors which allow them to be identified underwater.

Placement
Many state that more success is found with placement on the substrate. It is not the substrate itself that benefits the coral, but the less-intense water flow and less-direct light. I have kept the pinks in the substrate, but the dark red one has been placed up near the top on my rocks when I had less lighting and it was not hit with direct flow. All of my Goniopora's currently reside in my substrate and that is where they will stay due to my lighting and flow. They are located just 24 in. from (2) 250-W metal-halide lights with 20K XM bulbs. I also supplement with daylight VHOs. The tank was also originally set up as an SPS tank, so it also has moderate to high flow with a Tunze 6000. The first link listed below is to the Advance Aquarist, which has detailed information for each variety of Goniopora and its placement for light and flow.

Feeding
I currently do not target feed my Goniopora's. I feed daily with Rod's Food which has small foods that the Goniopora eats such as Cyclop-eeze, rotifers and DT's oyster eggs. I also dose a capful of DT's Live Marine Phytoplankton-Premium Reef Blend every other day. I also try and feed live baby brine shrimp every other week.
I do have a jar of DT's oyster eggs in the freezer just waiting to be used. Per DT's website: " Corals for which this food is particularly useful are those with poor prey capture responses and those with very small polyps. Included are Porites , Montipora , Goniopora , gorgonians, soft corals. The oyster eggs even show success with the maintenance of previously difficult or impossible to maintain azooxanthellate soft corals and seafans.
DT's Live Marine Phytoplankton - Premium Reef Blend naturally provides needed nutrition for your reef inhabitants, through both directly feeding some reef inhabitants and indirectly feeding others by increasing their food supply. There is evidence that soft corals, along with Goniopora and gorgonians may also benefit from the direct consumption of phytoplankton."
I also run a 70-gal refugium with a deep sand bed and the use of these methods also encourage the growth of a variety of small zooplankton and plankton-producing organisms (by spawning, larvae in water column).


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Old 10/06/2010, 12:08 PM   #7
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I have heard the red ones like more light so I placed one midway in my tank under 4x54 t5 and within a couple of days all polyps had fallen off the skeleton. I tried moving it down but it did not save the few that were left. I ordered mine from Dr F&S LADD and thought it would be bullet proof. To do it again I would only buy one I could physically see first and verify the health of the coral.


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Old 10/06/2010, 01:04 PM   #8
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Color is irrelevant. The concern is the species, which may or may not be all that easy to determine.

As far as needing pristine water, I think that is an excuse devised by someone who found that they could not keep theirs alive. Goniopora are predominantly found in lagoon environments - very nutrient rich, often to the point of being turbid. Not exactly what I would call pristine. I have seen suggestions of having them in a tank that does not have a skimmer, so that plankton is not removed from the water. That is probably a very good idea.

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/2005/10/aafeature2


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Old 10/06/2010, 03:06 PM   #9
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Read these

http://reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1901883

http://reefcentral.com/forums/showth...ight=goniopora


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Old 10/06/2010, 04:07 PM   #10
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I started a thread about my new one and got some good feedback. I have had mine for I guess a month. No new polyps, that I can see. But the extension has increased and there has been no signs of decline. need new lights and haven't tried any direct feeding yet so that's probably why there isn't any new growth.. I have Kept my water a little "dirtier" to keep elements in the water which I have understood as essential. (This has been a struggle b.c of my bta who likes pristine water).
Check out my thread there were some great links and advice.
I'm still learning too..


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Old 10/06/2010, 04:45 PM   #11
potpushr
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Thanks twistedenvy... Lotta good info in those threads..


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Old 10/06/2010, 05:10 PM   #12
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Your response is very difficult. Need a lot of food and specialized care.


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Old 10/06/2010, 05:20 PM   #13
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Long term success with these corals are not good, Most die within a year of being in captivity. That being said it's best to leave them in the ocean JMO. The Problem is no one knows for sure the feeding habits of these beautiful corals and they slowly starve to death.
Bill


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Old 10/06/2010, 05:57 PM   #14
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Some say they need iodine supplements to increase the chances of survival.., probably true.
Pristine water is a crock, though. People who have kept them longer than a year or year & a half have found Protein Skimmers to be a negative factor. They need nutrient rich water & VERY small plankton for success. IMHO, best left in the Ocean unless they are frags from a long-term surviving colony (2+ years MINIMUM). This coral is notorious for appearing to thrive for many months & then crashing almost overnight.

Matthew


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Old 10/06/2010, 06:01 PM   #15
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The new coral magazine talks about corals and feeding and there is some good information about goniopora explaining why they often do not do well in captivity.


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Old 10/06/2010, 06:06 PM   #16
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I have had a green goniopora for about 8 weeks under regular stocklighting and it has doubled in size. Mine is great! The polyps extend about 2.5 inches!


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Old 10/06/2010, 08:10 PM   #17
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I have a green goniopora. for atleast 3 months now.
I run it under 8x54w t5
I don't spot feed it.
I give it medium flow
The polyps extend atleast 6 inches for a total of over a foot in diameter.

I haven't had any trouble with that or my elegance.


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Old 10/06/2010, 09:50 PM   #18
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My trick is to place right under whwre i feed my fish and every other day I feed Rods Reef original. My red is in a moderately high flow area at the half level but shaded by some large sps colonies. It doubled in size in two years and has encrusted comepletely onto the rock. I believe its the golden peaels in rods reef. Oh by the way its an sps dominated tank and my nutrients are immesurable.


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Old 10/07/2010, 01:50 PM   #19
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I've had a red one with yellow centres for about 10 months now. in that time it has only maybe doubled in number of polyps, but at least it is growing.

I do not skim and have loads of plankton coming from refugium.


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Old 10/07/2010, 06:07 PM   #20
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Please note! 8 Weeks & 3 months in no way equals success with Gonis! These corals are notorius for appearing to thrive for a year or more..
Then they crash, RTN appears, soon you have a skeleton only. Aside from that issue, they are EXTREMELY prone to Brown Jelly infections. Any mechanical injury can cause it, like hermit crabs walking on them. Clownfish trying to host in them will also kill them.

Matthew


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Old 10/07/2010, 06:14 PM   #21
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I have the reds with yellow polyps, and sporadic flecks of white on the polyps. They are beautiful. I've had mine for about two years. Pristine water cannot be what mine needs. On the contrary, I have a heavy bio load, and feed my fish well. I keep mine to the side of the tank about 24" below a 400 watt MH. It has grown slow, but very well ever since I've had it. I've never had any issues with any sort of declining health with mine. Im sure parameters play a role as well. I keep my alk and calc very stable, and my temperature too. That being said, your mileage may vary.

:-)


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Old 10/08/2010, 03:26 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheol View Post
Please note! 8 Weeks & 3 months in no way equals success with Gonis! These corals are notorius for appearing to thrive for a year or more..
Then they crash, RTN appears, soon you have a skeleton only. Aside from that issue, they are EXTREMELY prone to Brown Jelly infections. Any mechanical injury can cause it, like hermit crabs walking on them. Clownfish trying to host in them will also kill them.
Matthew
whutwo...I have a nice piece that I won during a raffle at MACNA 2010 and this past week my Clowns have been trying to host it at times and seems to be ****ing it off. I need to find a solution FAST!


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Old 10/08/2010, 05:59 PM   #23
Sheol
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Remove the fish or remove the coral, STAT! Personally, I'd like to strangle the person who invented "Reef Safe" which means only that a fish WON'T eat coral. Clowns are the biggest PITAs in this hobby!

Matthew


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Old 10/09/2010, 10:40 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheol View Post
Please note! 8 Weeks & 3 months in no way equals success with Gonis! These corals are notorius for appearing to thrive for a year or more..
Then they crash, RTN appears, soon you have a skeleton only. Aside from that issue, they are EXTREMELY prone to Brown Jelly infections. Any mechanical injury can cause it, like hermit crabs walking on them. Clownfish trying to host in them will also kill them.

Matthew
Matthew is correct. I call these "rent a coral" as they almost always never survive captive collection. The biggest thing most think is they are missing something in the tank they get on the reef.


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Old 10/10/2010, 08:14 AM   #25
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I had a green gonni for 10 or 15 years. IMHO, its all about food. Without adequate food they go downhill in a hurry. Back then, they had a product like those fresh water feeder blocks you drop in the tank when you go on vacation, but these were designed for filter feeders. I knew when it was time to replace the block because the gonni's expansion would decrease. I also fed it my own blender mush. It grew to about half the size of a basket ball and dropped little ones all the time.




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