Reef Central Online Community
Tampa Bay Saltwater

Home Forum Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences View New Posts View Today's Posts

Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Search Reefkeeping ...an online magazine for marine aquarists Support our sponsors and mention Reef Central

Go Back   Reef Central Online Community > General Interest Forums > Tank Journals & Builds
Register Blogs FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Notices

User Tag List

Reply
Thread Tools
Old 10/07/2018, 10:35 PM   #26
peekay
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Libertyville, IL
Posts: 46
Looks great! I'm local too (Mundelein) and I'm super cheap too and starting a build. LOL. Following!


peekay is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10/08/2018, 12:15 PM   #27
930Reef
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by peekay View Post
Looks great! I'm local too (Mundelein) and I'm super cheap too and starting a build. LOL. Following!
Awesome! How big?


930Reef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/08/2018, 12:16 PM   #28
930Reef
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Posts: 104
Octagon!

Sorry, just realized I've been typing hexagon instead of octagon this whole time. It's an octagon. Just contacted TruVu through their website and it looks like they can actually give me some more info on it! Maybe 74-76, not 72 as originally thought. I'm super interested in the tank history.


930Reef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/08/2018, 01:52 PM   #29
peekay
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Libertyville, IL
Posts: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by 930Reef View Post
Awesome! How big?
75g, haven't determined sump size yet.

Here's my journal: http://reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2684834


peekay is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10/12/2018, 06:49 PM   #30
930Reef
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Posts: 104
Wavemakers too much!

Picked up two RW 15 wavemakers from a tank breakdown. Waaay to powerful for this tank. Selling and picking up some PP4s instead.


930Reef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/19/2018, 11:45 PM   #31
930Reef
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Posts: 104
Picked up a SW4 and on full power, it's just ok for the tank. I positioned it as the wavemaker closest (still far enough away) to my BTAs and it doens't blow them around so much, so hopefully they'll stay put. I think I'll find a PP8 or an SW8 for the other side of the tank.

Also, I almost learned the hard way about redundancy in drains. Holy cow.

I was in my LFS talking about how I should've gone herbie at least, maybe bean animal, instead of the single 1" Durso, since my Jebao 4000 (maybe 3000, can't remember) runs on lowest setting and has a ball valve on the return line that's 80% closed and still almost overflows my drain line. Not enough drainage without full siphon I think.

Anyway, while I was processing all of this, I was looking at the tank this evening. Ready to hit the hay for the night. I heard a weird draining/sucking noise, and water began to hit the floor out of the top of the tank. A turbo, for the first time ever, entered the durso and clogged it. Got himself jammed. Had this happened 5 minutes later, I would've not been around, and had many, many gallons of water on the floor and probably down in the crawlspace. I'm now ordering a gate valve and planning on adding overflow box internally to set up and drill for a herbie. I took the snail out but now will not rest easily until the tank's got an emergency overflow. Live and learn, I suppose, but man did I get lucky that this happened while I was standing there. Wow.

Oh, and my nems, live rock, clown, corals, and CUC are now all in their new home. All seems fine. Really short cycle that kinda never happened. I have some diatoms now, and an algae outbreak of green hair here and there on the acrylic, but nothing too bad or unexpected for a newer tank. Everybody seems happy at the moment. I'm loving the extra space, and I gave my old nano setup to a science teacher where I teach so he can have a little slice of the ocean for his 7th graders. Pretty excited about it all round. They love the 5-10 gallon FW tank with a few neon tetras in it and a hob filter. Wait until they get a look at even a basic ocellaris and some easy coral frags.


930Reef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/20/2018, 11:15 AM   #32
Dsekula
Registered Member
 
Dsekula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Sterling
Posts: 240
Redundancy in the drain lines is always good. Putting some strainers on them will also help keep out snails etc. ime. You really shouldn't greatly valve down your return pump on a regular basis. It will cause extra stress on the motor and prematurely age it. You want your lines sized so that the main line can handle the max flow of the pump with pump head calculated (or with out head value to be extra safe) and then an emergency of the same size. You then use use valves on the tank effluent side to control flow out of the dt. For example my two return pumps each pump 10gpm through 3/4" lines with head loss. (20gpm) My drain lines are all 1 1/2" because the line can handle a max flow of 35 gpm unobstructed (ime an aquarium line is never completely unobstructed) so the max flow into the dt is 20gpm and the max flow out is 35gpm now I can sleep easy not worrying about overflows.

Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk


Dsekula is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10/20/2018, 08:45 PM   #33
moondoggy4
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: menifee So cal
Posts: 10,949
I have a Dual Hexagon tank connected with two tubes, I bought it back in the mid 80's. I think it is about 50 gallons or so.


moondoggy4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/20/2018, 09:02 PM   #34
930Reef
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dsekula View Post
Redundancy in the drain lines is always good. Putting some strainers on them will also help keep out snails etc. ime. You really shouldn't greatly valve down your return pump on a regular basis. It will cause extra stress on the motor and prematurely age it. You want your lines sized so that the main line can handle the max flow of the pump with pump head calculated (or with out head value to be extra safe) and then an emergency of the same size. You then use use valves on the tank effluent side to control flow out of the dt. For example my two return pumps each pump 10gpm through 3/4" lines with head loss. (20gpm) My drain lines are all 1 1/2" because the line can handle a max flow of 35 gpm unobstructed (ime an aquarium line is never completely unobstructed) so the max flow into the dt is 20gpm and the max flow out is 35gpm now I can sleep easy not worrying about overflows.

Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk
Everything you wrote is exactly what I should've been doing all along. My nano never had these issues, but that was just dumb luck. Now that the overflows are bigger and so is the potential for flooding, it needs to be done right.

Ordered a gate valve today, and am going to drill one more hole for a properly plumbed herbie, along with an internal overflow box I'll fabricate and install. (I'm sure I'll be buying an overflow box if I mess up fabricating, but I have scrap acrylic so I'll try that first


930Reef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/20/2018, 11:26 PM   #35
Dsekula
Registered Member
 
Dsekula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Sterling
Posts: 240
Let me know if you need acrylic tips I'm always willing to share. Check my build if you want proof of experience

Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk


Dsekula is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10/21/2018, 12:40 AM   #36
930Reef
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dsekula View Post
Let me know if you need acrylic tips I'm always willing to share. Check my build if you want proof of experience

Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk
Will do. Thanks! Have to dig deep to my 8th grade plastics shop class technique...


930Reef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/21/2018, 12:01 PM   #37
Dsekula
Registered Member
 
Dsekula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Sterling
Posts: 240
They taught you plastics in school!? That would have been awesome! I would have traded my gym class where all we did was play ping pong (most laughable class ever) for a plastics class any day. I had to go find a plastic shop and offer my labor for experience.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 930Reef View Post
Will do. Thanks! Have to dig deep to my 8th grade plastics shop class technique...
Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk


Dsekula is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10/21/2018, 02:27 PM   #38
930Reef
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dsekula View Post
They taught you plastics in school!? That would have been awesome! I would have traded my gym class where all we did was play ping pong (most laughable class ever) for a plastics class any day. I had to go find a plastic shop and offer my labor for experience.

Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk
Yeah, it was really awesome. They may still have it, though this was early-mid 90s. Lincoln Jr. High (now middle school) in Park Ridge, IL. Don Pasier was my teacher. Old time shop teacher. His wife also taught in the district. Exactly what made school great back in the day, and that's coming from someone who's been an 8th grade teacher for 13 years. Now all of our curriculum and administrators are afraid of anything that isn't "college ready" (i.e. trades and tradespeople that will ultimately out-earn me and my master's degree anyway).

All the standard shop power tools plus strip heaters and buffers, and even some basic injection molding with a hand-powered injection lever. All really cool, and the best part was that he showed you what to do and the final product, and then let you screw it up until you got it right on your own.

I tried to bring shop back to a district on the North Shore, and they just weren't interested. I'm an English teacher and offered to get re-certified for industrial ed. No go. It's a shame, really. Few jr. highs even have woods/industrial drawing anymore, even while constantly beating the drum of STEM.

We have a "maker space" that looks like someone went dumpster diving at jo-ann fabrics. Playdoh and strips of fabric, cheetah-print duct tape, etc. Seriously. It's what happens when you put school administrators in charge of something that you actually have to know something about instead of nonsensical platitudes. Same people who somehow take a boastful tone when they say, "Oh, I can't even change a tire. I call AAA." Shameful, shameful.

Other than that, I have no opinion on the matter


930Reef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/21/2018, 02:53 PM   #39
Dsekula
Registered Member
 
Dsekula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Sterling
Posts: 240
Hahaha!!! Omg that space sounds insanely amusing I don't doubt I'd have fun in there as well but the playdoh skillset can't compair to the various shop skills. I auctually got lucky in highschool. I had a jerk of a guidance counselor. I finished all my credits for highschool graduation my Jr year minus one English and a weekly pe class. The counselor wouldn't let me do work study ( co-op, half and half, what ever the term is for go to school part day and work the rest where you are) because she said I was too smart (most kids who did that didn't go to college or a trade school just entered the work force) that wasn't my goal but whatever. So since I was stuck in school all day with nothing to do but get in trouble I decided to sign up for wood shop, metal shop, and auto shop all day (after a dozen or so visits to the principal I really wasn't given a choice). The insane part of that was that I'd get in trouble for doing things like reading not school books (things like lotr god forbid) or taking a nap since I worked full-time night shift illegally since they didn't approve my work study and my family needed the money. I went to college got a degree in architectural engineering (college education) then couldn't find a job with the degree and got licenced as a water and wastewater operator (trade). Now I own my own business and can afford to eat three meals a day so I absolutely agree with your opinion. I'm 30 and from Pennsylvania btw, just to give you an idea who your chatting with

Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk


Dsekula is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10/21/2018, 04:18 PM   #40
930Reef
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Posts: 104
Funny. I was an English major at University of Illinois and hated all the stuff we were supposed to like. Professors pretentiosly thought Tolkien was nonsense fiction, despite the fact that all three of those books were (and are) my favorite of all time (not to mention Hobbit). They apparently ignored the fact that the man wrote his own language and knew more about English than anybody. (Oxford professor I think?)

Worst part re: trades is that the district where I teach now is insanely wealthy and could have the best shop program anywhere. The high school we feed into has glassblowing and guitar making. And no feeder program from us.

When I say insanely wealthy, I mean we have professional sports owners of Chicago teams, the IL Governor, etc., who all live(d) on the shore of Lake Michigan.

I have a buddy who became a teacher, couldn't find a job, and works at the wastewater reclamation district for a suburb here, as an engineer, and makes a better living than any of us.


930Reef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/21/2018, 04:55 PM   #41
Dsekula
Registered Member
 
Dsekula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Sterling
Posts: 240
Oh wow highschool with a luthier and glass blowing class that would be amazing! It makes no sense to not have something building into that? I'm in super rural pa up in the Pocono mountains. It's an odd culture here the trades are more common knowledge and a way of life for most people. My neighbors; own a stone quarry, raise chickens and produce, raise beef, and have a goat herd. Everyone has a basic wood/metal shop either in their own barn or shared with a neighbor. Not knowing how to change a tire is unheard of since most people maintain their own farm equipment and keep it running untill it's dead as dead. I intentionally moved here

In comparison where I grew up was more of a suburban area (only about 2hrs away) and sounds more twords the area you decribed. There was a certain snobbery twords the trades but it was quite poor in general so there's an odd counter culture going on where young people are above learning a trade and will only go to college but then don't get jobs and just work the system. Even though I didn't move far I much prefer the area I moved to from a cultural knowledge stand point I just couldn't stay in the area I lived as a kid, the ignorance was mind numbing. Around here if you say to your neighbor I think I'm going to put a new shed in my lower field, the response is usually something like "let me know if you need a hand, we can arrange a time together and maybe after you can help me fix the roof on mine that's been leaking" it's just assumed that you'd be building it yourself because, why wouldn't you .


Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk


Dsekula is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10/21/2018, 05:18 PM   #42
Dsekula
Registered Member
 
Dsekula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Sterling
Posts: 240
I've always kind of wondered if the whole school system was generally a mess or it was just around here. I know for me the whole "no child gets left behind" act was like a bad joke. past about 4th grade I was forced to sit in class with a bunch of kids that didn't care to learn and we'd do the same thing over and over untill everyone passed . I quite literally compaired my Jr year highschool math book and 4th grade math book to find the exact same lessons. One book was intro to basic geometry and the other said advanced calculus. That's really sad. As I said I got in trouble a lot, not because I was auctually a trouble maker type child but who could stand sitting in the same class for eight years straight, of course I found other things to do. Most were really nerdy outlets of my friends and I trying to auctually learn something and having some fun. I remember making paper swords and acting out the final scene in hamlet . We built our own moonshine still in the chem lab (never auctually made shine in it tho). We "fixed" one jerk teacher's computer so when they went in to enter grades it only let them put in As, but that was as bad as we got. The staff would focus on us while kids selling drugs and beating eachother we're relatively accepted .

Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk


Dsekula is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10/21/2018, 05:30 PM   #43
Dsekula
Registered Member
 
Dsekula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Sterling
Posts: 240
And yes I love(d) the tolkien books. There's excellent character development and tons of minor sub plot details that follow straight through to the conclusion of the books. They are, imho, an excellent excution of literature.

Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk


Dsekula is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10/30/2018, 10:02 PM   #44
930Reef
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Posts: 104
Picked up another 1" bulkhead today to begin to plumb the full siphon drain for a herbie setup. The determining factor will be if my acrylic overflow box that I'm building is water tight. Have 3/5 sides made. Cut teeth according to Joey King of DIY on my tablesaw using a stop. Anxious to actually let my return pump do its job and have overflows that can handle the return rate. Also thinking of building a small manifold from which I can run a BRS dual GFO/Carbon reactor off my return pump. Should be plenty strong enough. Thoughts?


930Reef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/30/2018, 10:34 PM   #45
Dsekula
Registered Member
 
Dsekula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Sterling
Posts: 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by 930Reef View Post
Picked up another 1" bulkhead today to begin to plumb the full siphon drain for a herbie setup. The determining factor will be if my acrylic overflow box that I'm building is water tight. Have 3/5 sides made. Cut teeth according to Joey King of DIY on my tablesaw using a stop. Anxious to actually let my return pump do its job and have overflows that can handle the return rate. Also thinking of building a small manifold from which I can run a BRS dual GFO/Carbon reactor off my return pump. Should be plenty strong enough. Thoughts?
Thoughts;
Excellent idea in general but idk if I'd run the carbon, gfo, etc off of your return. Different media takes a certain contact time or flow rate to be effective, if your return pump matches that great! If not your media should be run off a separate pump. Each cartridge filter also has a set max Flow. If your attempting to pump more than the max the filters will act as a flow restrictor.

So if all your equipment is sized appropriately all the way through yes great idea, if not you may want to consider a second or even two more pumps to run the cartridge filters. I know that's personally the way I ended up going but with a basement sump my turn over is vastly different than what the cartridge filters need and require

Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk


Dsekula is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11/06/2018, 11:55 AM   #46
930Reef
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Posts: 104
Overflow box needed, and built.

So, my original plumbing with my single 1" durso did not work nearly well enough to satisfy my water turnover needs. Simply rookie mistake learning process, which I'm glad about.

Even with a smallish Jebao DC3000 pump set at 30%, I still also had to add a ball valve and close it 80% of the way to create artificial head pressure so that my overflow could run smoothly. Not the right way to do things, especially if I'm taking the time to build from the ground up.

I had some scrap 1/4" clear acrylic, and fabricated an overflow box with teeth. Rough dimensions are around 8" wide, 5 inches tall, and 4 inches front to back.

I cut teeth into it using the table saw w/ a stop method that I saw on King of DIY (Joey is his name I think?), and it worked pretty well. Superglued a few joints and ended up getting plastruct glue from a hobby store to experiment as well. Combination of both in different places worked well. I'm sure the Plastruct is a better material, but I'm just not good with it yet. Superglue allowed for a little sloppiness on my part.

Spraypainted the inside black to help with hopefully slowing algae growth, and I attached it to the back of the tank by running the two bulkheads through it.

I needed an extra 2 ridged rubber gaskets that come with bulkheads, and being too impatient to order just the gaskets online, I bought 2 bathtub rubber drain gaskets from home depot. They are the exact same thing, as far as I can tell, and they're around $2 each. They worked perfectly, and have the necessary small ridges to create a good seal against the tank.

I put one gasket inside the overflow box, as you normally would on a tank, and also put one between the tank and the wall of the overflow box. No leaks.

I used an upturned elbow for my emergency drain, and a downturned elbow on my full siphon. My favorite thing about the plumbing update was cutting out all the nonsense elbows, etc., that I had on my drain before. They kept everything looking great, but they were not efficient. I replumbed my return as well, so that the drains and returns are now just straight shots to the sump once they clear the bulkhead in back of the tank. Minimal 90s (2 on return, 1 on each drain), and a couple 45s instead.

I'm absolutely loving the control with the pvc gate valve I added for the siphon drain line. I'm done with ball valves for foreseeable future.

After everything was tuned properly, I've got my return pump running unrestricted at 60%. No more ball valve. Glad I can finally control with the dc pump controller, as was intended in the first place. I may need to dial it back a bit, as it's probably a little more than I need. I'm going to experiment with 45% today after work.

My rough calculations are showing that I'm getting possibly 20x the turnover I had before, and am now able to appropriately move water through the system any number of times/hr that I'd like. When I stopped to do the math, I came up with only about 40-80 gal/hr turnover with my old setup. New one: with no ball valve, pump power doubled from 30 to 60 percent, and the siphon overflow, I'm at about 800 gph. Real number is probably slightly less due to small head loss in its 36" trip up the pipes. Either way, I'm thrilled. Now thinking of using my old durso bulkhead as another return to split the return flow evenly across tank. Currently, that bulkhead is plugged and I drilled the herbie setup new, in the middle of the tank's back wall where I had better access above the overflow box. (I had to trim a bit from the eurobraced top, but minimal and nothing structurally deal-breaking. I now have access to my whole overflow box.

The impetus for this re-plumbing came from 3 things:

1. Not enough flow in tank. Not using my pump or new tank to its full potential. Plus, algae to boot, and I think my filtration was lagging due to not enough water cycling through. I know skimmers need time, but this was too slow I think.

2. I had a diamond goby that I was SO happy with. Without the overflow box, he made it down the durso, into the sump, and then out onto the floor within 12 hours of purchase. If my kids ask, he's just hiding. By adding a secure overflow box, I'm protecting the bulkheads a little more from livestock going for a ride (I know this can/will still happen, but at least now I'm in better shape to help minimize). I want another goby, but won't risk the fish's life until I'm set up properly. The overflow box was a huge part of that.

3. Near-disaster induced by a snail. It always bothered me to not have an emergency pipe in my setup. On my old nano it wasn't a huge deal, but this system has nearly 70 gallons of water running through, and a bigger pipe opening in the bulkhead. About a week ago, I was turning out the lights to go to bed, and I heard a weird flow noise. A perfectly-sized turbo had crawled into my unprotected overflow elbow, and the tank water was starting to flood over top of the tank. I shut down, but he was still jammed like crazy in that elbow. Had I gone to bed 5 minutes earlier, I would've never caught it, and it would've been a disaster in my living room. No more of that.

The plastic fabrication took awhile because I hadn't worked much with acrylic since junior high shop. Good news is, unlike the "water-tight box" test that I failed miserably in plastics class in 1995, I passed this one. Mr. Pasier would be proud

Will make a lid or cover the box somehow. Thinking a like that completes a solid top for my tank will be best: I really want a secure environment for a goby. I'm not super concerned about surface gas exchange, as I have plenty of flow and agitation, and an open-topped sump.

Thoughts anybody? Thanks! I'll add a finished-operational photo later.


Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_5826.jpg (47.9 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_5827.jpg (49.2 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_5834.jpg (39.0 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_5836.JPG (84.9 KB, 2 views)

Last edited by 930Reef; 11/06/2018 at 12:00 PM.
930Reef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11/06/2018, 12:03 PM   #47
930Reef
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Chicago NW Suburbs
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dsekula View Post
Oh wow highschool with a luthier and glass blowing class that would be amazing! It makes no sense to not have something building into that? I'm in super rural pa up in the Pocono mountains. It's an odd culture here the trades are more common knowledge and a way of life for most people. My neighbors; own a stone quarry, raise chickens and produce, raise beef, and have a goat herd. Everyone has a basic wood/metal shop either in their own barn or shared with a neighbor. Not knowing how to change a tire is unheard of since most people maintain their own farm equipment and keep it running untill it's dead as dead. I intentionally moved here

In comparison where I grew up was more of a suburban area (only about 2hrs away) and sounds more twords the area you decribed. There was a certain snobbery twords the trades but it was quite poor in general so there's an odd counter culture going on where young people are above learning a trade and will only go to college but then don't get jobs and just work the system. Even though I didn't move far I much prefer the area I moved to from a cultural knowledge stand point I just couldn't stay in the area I lived as a kid, the ignorance was mind numbing. Around here if you say to your neighbor I think I'm going to put a new shed in my lower field, the response is usually something like "let me know if you need a hand, we can arrange a time together and maybe after you can help me fix the roof on mine that's been leaking" it's just assumed that you'd be building it yourself because, why wouldn't you .


Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk

Totally. I look at property in Wisconsin for that very reason. One day, with money, it would be great to do that, as my wife and I both have summers off. Maybe need to get out of reefing first if I want money...


930Reef is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:55 PM.


TapaTalk Enabled

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2018 Axivo Inc.
Use of this web site is subject to the terms and conditions described in the user agreement.
Reef CentralTM Reef Central, LLC. Copyright 1999-2014
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.3.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.